Andy Brodeur

Andy Brodeur joined Jurassic Roadshow last year, and what a welcome addition he is! Always enthusiastic, always ready to help, always ready to learn as well as to teach, and always generous with his knowledge, time, and efforts. He’s ingenious with his hands, too. Andy makes wonderful little easels to display his bigger fossil slabs and, even better for everyone, he made a rock-carrying cart from an old baby buggy and who-knows-what-else, a real boon to everybody when we’re setting up a show. Here is his Fossil Story: 

Since I was a boy I’ve always liked rocks but never really enjoyed them as a hobby. I really got interested in them totally by accident when I went on the mineral web site MINDAT looking for historical information on the Loudville Lead Mines in Southampton, MA. In corresponding with a local man who knew quite a lot about them, he asked if I collected minerals or belonged to a mineral club, to which I answered no. He was a member of the Connecticut Valley Mineral Club and invited me to come to a meeting and I did. That was in the winter of 2007/2008 and I joined the club. I was totally hooked after my first mineral collecting trip and so began the insatiable quest to learn and discover what I could about

Andy Brodeur in front of a  pillow basalt glacial erratic  on the M&M Trail on Mount Tom in western Massachusetts. The site is not far from The Trustees of Reservations Dinosaur Footprints site on the Connecticut River between Holyoke and Northampton.

Andy Brodeur in front of a pillow basalt glacial erratic on the M&M Trail on Mount Tom in western Massachusetts. The site is not far from The Trustees of Reservations Dinosaur Footprints site on the Connecticut River between Holyoke and Northampton. Photo courtesy of Ed Gregory.

minerals and the history of their locations. I became the President of the Club in 2009 and haven’t looked back!

My fossil interest didn’t come along till 2010, when I went to Ausable Chasm in NY and saw a large lithified sand ripple plate on display. That image stayed in my brain, and one day when I was walking around the Whiting Street Reservoir in Holyoke I found a sand ripple. I had ventured off the main trail to find a place to relieve myself and there it was. I knew that there were dino tracks not far away on Rt 5, but never knew there were other fossil related structures in the area. That began the fossil study that drives me today. I started hiking in the area more and more, and the more I looked, the more I found. As you can imagine, the Fossil questions this prompted were more than the fossil answers I was finding. Since I had no formal training in geology or fossils, I started attending local seminars in search of answers, introducing myself to some key people and showing them some of my finds.

I saw the Jurassic Roadshow in Greenfield in 2011 and that really sparked my interest. I found my first dinosaur track on Easter Sunday 2012 and joined the Jurassic Roadshow that year also. I’ve learned more about fossils than I ever imagined and have come to enjoy the company and camaraderie of not only amateur fossil/geology enthusiasts but accomplished professionals as well. I enjoy sharing my hobby and knowledge with any that are interested and my passion is the outdoors and discovery and new adventures.

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